Depression – Maralyn Smith

Help me please, I want my life back

Thankfully more and more people are prepared to speak out about the horrors of depression nowadays, and we hope this excellent submission from Maralyn Smith offers comfort. Maralyn has very kindly provided two submissions to Voices, and this poem will be entered into the competition. Thank you again Maralyn for sharing your eloquent and thoughtful poetry.

Depression

The void. The darkness. How long does it last?

My normal life seems way back in the past.

I cry, I shout and then I scream.
Is my normal life really just a dream?
How do I cope? What do I do?
No one knows what I’m going through.
My family and friends don’t understand why
I shout and scream and then breakdown and cry.
“Take the tablets”, is what they say,
“You’ll feel better tomorrow or the next day”.
Tomorrow comes and I still feel sad,
I’m starting to think that I’m going mad.
I need some help and I need it quick,
I’m starting to panic and I’m feeling sick.
The family’s come home and they need to be fed,
But I just want to go back to my bed.
At my empty life I ponder, then cry,
I feel so alone I just want to die.
Help me please, I want my life back.
How long does it take to get back on track?

The void? The darkness? How long does it last?
Well, it’s taken some years but it’s now in the past.

Maralyn Smith, Coalville, Leicestershire

Did you enjoy this poem? Why not visit Maggie’s website at: Maggie’s Centre Nottingham to find out more about their exceptional work and/or make a donation.

Do you have a poem you would like to submit to Voices? Feel free to do so by email at: voicespoetry@outlook.com or via the ‘Contact’ page on this site.

Purple Flowers Bloom – Darran Cosgrove

I offer a hand that should be strong

Purple Petaled Flower Field

Thank you to Darran Cosgrove for his moving offering to the Voices Poetry Blog and competition. The sight of flowers conjure up a myriad of emotions for us all: loss, romance, grief, happiness, hope… Darran is a student currently residing in Bathgate who ‘enjoys writing whenever he can, mostly on the train or when essays are overdue.’ We are sure you will appreciate his excellent work.

Purple Flowers Bloom

Purple flowers bloom, their sight is succor to our forgotten,

Who’ve aged years before their time, stricken fast by cruel chance.

They battle the body, showing spirit beyond ken.

What drives them I cannot know.

Fear or family, faith?

My own fate is simply to watch. I offer a hand that should be strong,

It shakes with the shame I fear I show.

In their eyes I see resolve, a burning vigor no disease can slow.

They break the grip and stand steady,

They’ll bring me to the garden when I’m ready.

Darran Cosgrove, 21, Bathgate

Did you enjoy this poem? Why not visit Maggie’s website at: Maggie’s Centre Nottingham to find out more about their exceptional work and/or make a donation.

Do you have a poem you would like to submit to Voices? Feel free to do so by email at: voicespoetry@outlook.com or via the ‘Contact’ page on this site.

Skaters – Max Scratchmann

Your spirit glides like a skater

Close-up Photography of Snowflake

Skaters

a fictional life of the poet, Charlotte Mew

Sometimes life’s most fleeting moments leave the largest impact. Vivid and haunting – Max Scratchmann’s offering entitled ‘Skaters’ conjures up a variety of potent and mysterious images. Max is based in Edinburgh and is a highly regarded writer, poet and illustrator who also runs the performance group Poetry Circus. Find out more about Max at his website: www.scratchmann.co.uk. Thank you for your kind contribution to ‘Voices’.


Shhhh!
Cobwebs spangled with pearls greet
the approaching dawn.

In a lonely room a television still
bleats and flickers,
While in the night air that is neither
dark nor morning
Your spirit glides like a skater
on the frozen Thames,
Glimpsed in the red glow of
a chestnut vendor’s coals
And then like some fairy thing,
gone. Gone.

Max Scratchmann, Edinburgh

Did you enjoy this poem? Why not visit Maggie’s website at: Maggie’s Centre Nottingham to find out more about their exceptional work and/or make a donation.

Do you have a poem you would like to submit to Voices? Feel free to do so by email at: voicespoetry@outlook.com or via the ‘Contact’ page on this site.

Cities Are Like Deserts – Tamara Hidal Goisern

the evil remain in the cities or they are dead

Grey Concrete Structure

What will the world of tomorrow be like? Tamara Hidal Goisern provides very interesting food for thought in ‘Cities are Like Deserts’. Tamara is from Spain and is currently studying English in Edinburgh. She is very passionate about language, literature and poetry. We thank Tamara very much for her vivid and thoughtful contribution to both the competition and the ‘Voices’ poetry blog.

Cities Are Like Deserts


Then, you also have the theme of shopping.
People love shopping. But by internet. Because they live in villages – now everybody lives in villages. There are not many people in the cities. In the news, you can see how everything is turned into ruins. Bus stops, trains, shopping centres… Only the small shops, inns, parks, and some squares and cinemas survive. But there are more and more people on the outskirts every day.

And they also say, there is not enough land for everyone, so we have to come back to the cities. But how do they want us to live there if there is nothing to do anymore? Every day smells worse and worse, and the few people who are still there are crazier and crazier. Old age, stress, suicide, and the ones who leave for the outskirts – cities are like deserts.

Every day grows hotter and hotter, and the communications are failing. There are no more births and no more doctors to attend them.

But here, in the village, is a wonderful life. Even if there are many people, you walk on the paths and all the cows and sheep gather together. Shepherds are not alone anymore, some of them gather together too, and there are lots of women and children who are starting better lives as well. The food each day gets better, the neighbours help each other in the fields, and they exchange the harvest. There are nurseries for kids, the youngest help the eldest and they learn from them, and the eldest, surrounded by youth, feel better.

But everyone is a bit scared of the city. Of course they lived there when they were younger and were forced to go to schools and breathe the toxic air. Here, we have many trees to climb and play in. Much land where animals are free, because the evil remain in the cities or they are dead. Here, for hundreds of years nothing untoward will happen. Okay… yes… small disputes, arguments, some broken marriages, misfortunes – those kind of things – but nothing else…

Tamara Hidal Goisern, Edinburgh

Did you enjoy this poem? Why not visit Maggie’s website at: Maggie’s Centre Nottingham to find out more about their exceptional work and/or make a donation.

Do you have a poem you would like to submit to Voices? Feel free to do so by email at: voicespoetry@outlook.com or via the ‘Contact’ page on this site.

The Promise of Spring – Christine Sinclair

I’ll rest in the winter but always be there

‘The Daffodils’ by William Wordsworth inspired Christine to write poetry

Christine Sinclair (2nd November 1946 – 13th February 2009)

A deep appreciation of nature and all her glory is a recurring theme throughout Christine’s poems. Born in Glasgow in 1946, she was inspired to write poetry after listening to a recital of William Wordsworth’s ‘The Daffodils’ at school. Christine regularly wrote humorous and poignant poems for family and friends on special occasions – demonstrating her fantastic talents. We are sure that the following poem entitled ‘The Promise of Spring‘ will help to brighten up your day and put a smile on your face – just as Christine would have wanted.

The Promise of Spring

I hold my head so high and proud
I feel much happier in a crowd
I toss my head in the gentle breeze
Enjoy my beauty, I want to please
My colour brings the promise of spring
I know I am a beautiful thing
Please treat me gently or I might break
And enjoy the beauty my friends and I make
Just love and respect me and hold me dear
And I will visit you every year
I'll rest in winter but always be there
Ready to please you if for me, you'll care
Whenever you see me you'll feel such a thrill
You know me so well I'm your sweet daffodil

Christine Sinclair, Glasgow

Did you enjoy this poem? Why not visit Maggie’s website at: Maggie’s Centre Nottingham to find out more about their exceptional work and/or make a donation.

Do you have a poem you would like to submit to Voices? Feel free to do so by email at: voicespoetry@outlook.com or via the ‘Contact’ page on this site.